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CONGRESSWOMAN JACKY ROSEN VISITS CODE CENTRAL, DISCUSSES HER BIPARTISAN STEM EDUCATION PROPOSALS THAT AWAIT ACTION IN THE SENATE

March 2, 2018
Press Release

LAS VEGAS, NV Today, Congresswoman Jacky Rosen (NV-03) attended the Code Central One Year Anniversary celebration. Code Central is an after-school technology center in Las Vegas that is dedicated to teaching Nevada’s young people about the fundamentals of programming, app development, and computer science. Rosen discussed her two bipartisan STEM education proposals, which recently passed the House as one combined bill.

 

“As a former computer programmer, I am always excited to meet bright students who are passionate about coding and computer programming,” said Rosen. “I believe that STEM education will give our children the skills necessary to become part of a strong, capable workforce. Successful initiatives like Code Central make me all the more excited about ensuring my Building Blocks of STEM bill moves forward in the Senate and becomes law.”

 

“We were honored to have Congresswoman Rosen visit Code Central,” said Eric Mendelsohn, Co-Founder and Director at Code Central. “She has been a great advocate for STEM education in Congress, and we were happy to share the experiences of our program participants with her. We were thrilled to see Congresswoman Rosen’s bipartisan STEM education legislation pass the House unanimously, and we hope to see it become law.”

 

BACKGROUND: This past month, two bipartisan bills Rosen introduced this Congress to improve STEM education passed the House of Representatives unanimously as one combined bill. The bipartisan Building Blocks of STEM Act (H.R. 3397), co-led by Reps. Jacky Rosen (D-NV) and Steve Knight (R-CA), would direct the National Science Foundation (NSF) to include funding for early childhood education in its Discovery Research PreK-12 program, which seeks to enhance the learning and teaching of STEM and address the immediate challenges that are facing PreK-12 STEM education. Currently, the Discovery Research PreK-12 program focuses the majority of its research on students in middle school and older.

 

H.R. 3397 came to the House floor after unanimously passing out of the House Science, Space, & Technology Committee, of which Reps. Rosen and Knight are Members. In committee, the text of Rep. Rosen's other bipartisan STEM bill -- the Code Like a Girl Act (H.R. 3316) -- was added to H.R. 3397. Introduced alongside Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY), the Code Like a Girl Act would create two NSF grant programs to encourage young girls to pursue computer science: one to understand what contributes to the participation of young girls under 11 in STEM and computer science, and one to develop and evaluate interventions in Pre-K and elementary school classrooms, with the goal of increasing girls’ participation.

 

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